The Museum of Chinese in America

Founded in 1980, the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) is dedicated to preserving and presenting the history, heritage, culture and diverse experiences of people of Chinese descent in the United States.

MOCA Monday: A Virtual Tour

The Museum of Chinese in America maintains an extensive archive and collection of Chinese American artifacts and oral histories. MOCA Mondays will briefly highlight one image or item from the collection. For more information, visit our website.

It has recently come to our attention that many of our blog visitors are not NYC locals, and have therefor not yet had a chance to visit the Museum! In a break from MOCA Monday’s commitment to showcasing images from the collections, we’d like to share a virtual tour of the space by artist, MOCA designer and Board of Trustees Co-Chair Maya Lin.

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MOCA Monday: Chinatown through the eyes of Big Brothers Big Sisters

The Museum of Chinese in America maintains an extensive archive and collection of Chinese American artifacts and oral histories. MOCA Mondays will briefly highlight one image or item from the collection. For more information, visit our website.

My Beautiful Chinatown, by the Littles of the Asian Mentoring Committee.

 

My Beautiful Chinatown, sponsored by Chinatown Partnership in collaboration with Big Brothers Big Sisters of NYC and the Asian Mentoring Committee. In May of 2010 MOCA hosted BBBS NYC and the AMC for A Night of Dreams. The Dreams Project challenged first generation Chinese-American Littles to openly discuss their dreams for the future and understand who they can strive to be. The exhibit displayed their original artwork conveying those dreams. Participation in the Project opened beautiful dialogue about how they can accomplish their dreams— what goals should be set, what career options are available, what steps should be taken to keep on track for success—and how embracing their cultural heritage is critical for a lifetime of happiness.

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MOCA Monday: The Flying Tigers

The Museum of Chinese in America maintains an extensive archive and collection of Chinese American artifacts and oral histories. MOCA Mondays will briefly highlight one image or item from the collection. For more information, visit our website.

The Flying Tigers in Ohio, 1943.

The Flying Tigers held their 68th annual reunion at MOCA in September of 2011. This photo hangs in the core exhibition With a Single Step: Stories in the Making of America, and depicts the first volunteer group to join the US Army Air Corps for service as a dual-language corps for intelligence work behind enemy lines in the China theater. (The volunteers actually signed up in a building on Mott Street here in New York!) The Flying Tigers, so nicknamed for the teeth painted on their fighter jets, are well-known for their exploits during World War II.

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A Farewell from Beatrice Chen

Our dear Director of Education and Public Programs, Beatrice Chen, had her final day at the Museum yesterday. While we will miss her, we’re thrilled for her next step. With Beatrice’s permission, we’ve reprinted her farewell letter so that all of our friends and fans can read her words. Please join us in wishing her well!

Dear Extended Family, Friends & Guardian Angels of MOCA:

Happy Year of the Dragon!

On February 13, I embark on a new adventure at The New York Public Library. As the Manager of Teaching & Learning, I will be working with the 86 branch libraries and four research libraries to help make NYPL’s collections and exhibitions accessible to K-12 students and teachers as a learning and teaching resource. Even though I consider myself a MOCA lifer, it was an offer that I simply couldn’t pass up.

It has been an amazing eight year journey with MOCA, filled with many rewarding moments, even amidst the considerable challenges of a growing institution taking a big leap. MOCA was introduced to me by an Urban Planning professor as an innovative organization at the nexus of culture and community/economic development. At that time, it was one of the few cultural organizations in the city that allowed me to integrate my interests in museum education, urban planning and history. Since then, many cultural organizations across the nation have adopted this interdisciplinary approach to better serve their communities. I leave MOCA believing that the same commitment to innovative museum practices and relevance to community still grounds its work, and inspires its trajectory as an ever evolving institution with national impact.

I feel blessed for this once in a career-lifetime opportunity to be part of a phenomenal team that implemented MOCA’s expansion from the initial planning stages in 2004 to the opening of our expanded space in 2009, and to seeing our current space–the beautiful galleries at 215 Centre as well as the newly reorganized archives at 70 Mulberry–activated with history, art, culture and critical conversations about identity.

I am forever grateful for the privilege of collaborating with and learning from so many incredible people. Over the years, I have drawn much inspiration from your dedication to your craft and your passion for your cause. Thank you for sharing your insight, expertise and yourself with MOCA, and for taking that leap of faith to invest in its enduring legacy.

I look forward to crossing paths with you soon, perhaps on an NYPL, Asian American or Chinatown project.

With gratitude,
Beatrice

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MOCA Monday: Port Arthur

The Museum of Chinese in America maintains an extensive archive and collection of Chinese American artifacts and oral histories. MOCA Mondays will briefly highlight one image or item from the collection. For more information, visit our website.

Port Arthur Restaurant publication, New York City, late 1800s-early 1900s. Courtesy of Eric Y. Ng.

Port Arthur Chinese Restaurant, opened in 1897 originally stood at 7-9 Mott Street in Manhattan. The banquet hall was the first Chinese restaurant in the neighborhood to obtain a liquor license, and served diners as a gathering place for celebrations of all kinds for nearly 85 years. Today, nothing remains of the once-opulent two-story building.

If you were going to celebrate with your family in Chinatown, where would you go?

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MOCA on Twitter

  • We've moved! Please follow along @mocanyc for Museum exhibitions and programs information and culturally relevant links. 7 years ago